Hélène Langevin-Joliot

Hélène Langevin-Joliot had quite a family legacy to live up to as the daughter and granddaughter of Nobel Prize winners, but she wasn’t deterred and has made her own impression on the world of physics.

Irene Joliot-Curie

Long before take your daughter to work day was created Irene Joliot-Curie was following in her mother’s footsteps and striking out on her own as well.

Mary Jackson

For Administrative Professionals Day, we’re honoring Mary Jackson, a woman who carved her own career path in engineering before switching roles to help others rise to the top.

Anne McLaren

Through her work in developmental biology, Anne McLaren helped develop the methods that would allow human in vitro fertilization.

Rosalind Franklin

It’s DNA day, and we’re celebrating the life and work of Rosalind Franklin, who helped discover the molecular structure of DNA, RNA, and even viruses.

Emmanuelle Charpentier

Emmanuelle Charpentier is a microbiologist who helped create CRISPR/Cas9.

Jennifer Doudna

An investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 1997, Dr. Jennifer Doudna has been responsible for bettering our understanding of the functions of RNA and for helping develop CRISPR/Cas9

Joan Brennecke

Today is Earth Day, and we’re celebrating the work of Dr. Joan Brennecke, who is researching ways to use ionic liquids to develop green processes.

Alice Bows-Larkin

As a climate researcher, Dr. Alice Bows-Larkin is connecting her academic research to policies in various areas to help deal with a changing planet.

Shannon Seneca

Inspired by visiting the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons production facility, Shannon Seneca became an engineer and now works to improve the health and well-being of the Seneca Nation.

Anne Glover

Declared the 19th most powerful women in the United Kingdom by Woman’s Hour on BBC Radio 4 in February 2013, Dr. Anne Glover has been influencing scientific policy and has been recognized for building up the importance of women in Science, Engineering, and Technology.

Lucy Jones

It’s been 110 years since a magnitude 7.8 earthquake hit San Francisco, and “Earthquake Lady” Dr. Lucy Jones wants to make sure that people are preparing for the next “big one” with the best available science and engineering.