Florence B. Seibert

Stricken by polio at the age of three, Dr. Florence Seibert turned to academics because she couldn’t go out and play like other children. In her career, she improved and standardized the test for tuberculosis.

Mildred Dresselhaus

Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, known as the Queen of Carbon Chemistry, has been a trailblazer since her early days.

Chiaki Mukai

Dr. Chiaki Mukai was already an established cardiac surgeon when she became the first Japanese woman to go to space.

Nettie Stevens

Dr. Nettie Stevens career as a geneticist wasn’t very long, lasting only about 11 years, but in that short time she was able to make huge strides in understanding genetic traits.

Ayah Bdeir

Engineer, artist, and inventor Ayah Bdeir has focused her career on democratizing hardware to make education and innovation more accessible.

Hertha Ayrton

When it was suggested that Marie Curie’s husband had actually been the one to discover the element radium Hertha Ayrton, a friend and colleague, quickly and publicly came to Curie’s defense stating, “errors are notoriously hard to kill, but an error that ascribes to a man what was actually the work of a woman has more lives than a cat.” And she would know as she often faced the same misattribution of credit being given to her husband.

Mary Edwards Walker

Mary Walker trained as a surgeon, volunteered for the Union Army in the Civil War, and is the only woman to have been awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Christine Darden

Dr. Christine Darden has said of her success as an engineer at NASA, “I was able to stand on the shoulders of those women who came before me, and women who came after me were able to stand on mine.” Learn more about the contributions this aerospace engineer on today’s podcast.

Dorothy Horstmann

It was believed that the polio virus directly attacked the central nervous system until Dr. Dorothy Horstmann made a ground breaking discovery about the mechanism involved with the spread of Polio in the body.

Shirley Ann Jackson

On July 1st, 1999 Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson became president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and since then she has transformed the oldest technical research university in the United States.

Marianne North

Marianne North rejected the conventions that biological specimens should be painted on simple white backgrounds. Her paintings instead kept the reality of the settings that she observed around the plants.

Jeanette E. Brown

Organic medicinal chemist Jeanette Brown is also a historian, author, and advocate for increasing diversity in science.